Tag Archives: George Washington

The Journal of Major George Washington: An Account of His First Official Mission, Made as Emissary from the Governor of Virginia to the Commandant of the French Forces on the Ohio, Oct. 1753-Jan. 1754

Only eight original copies still exist of this stirring journal kept by young Major George Washington on his mission in 1753-1754 to warn the French against encroaching on British territory. Facsimile edition. 42 pp.; 1 black-and-white drawing; map; 5 x 7¾ ;

George Washington

George Washington defined progressivism and provided the rationale for its constitutional basis in a vision of self-government: a nation dedicated to and capable of sustaining civil and religious liberty, the intertwined ends of politics as he saw it. For Washington, religious liberty was not a side benefit of independence but rather the objective for which independence was sought. Washingtons political philosophyradical for his timewas a commitment to the belief that law can never make just what is in its nature unjust. Before the close of the Revolutionary War, he had conceived of a union based on the progressive principle that the American people would qualify for self-government in the sense of free institutions in proportion to their moral capacity to govern themselves by the light of reason. Washington managed the conflicts over the spoils of victory that threatened to fracture the union. Containing this discord within the walls of the Constitution may be considered his single greatest achievement. This overview traces Washingtons political development through the war years, describes his contributions to the Constitution and the founding of America, debunks misrepresentations of Washingtons relationship to slavery, and touches his presidential administration, including his precedent-setting decision to retire from the presidency after two terms. This book will be useful in courses on the American founding era, American studies, political philosophy and leadership, as well as of interest and value to the general reader.

George Washington’s Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior: …And Other Important Writings

"Labour to keep alive in your breast that little celestial fire called conscience."

"Run not in the streets. . .nor with mouth open; go not upon the toes nor in a dancing fashion."
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George Washington’s Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation (Little Books of Wisdom)

Copied out by hand as a young man aspiring to the status of Gentleman, George Washington's 110 rules were based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in 1595. The first English edition of these rules was available in Francis Hawkins' Youths Behavior, or Decency in Conversation Amongst Men, which appeared in 1640, and it is from work that Washington seems to have copied. The rules as Washington wrote them out are a simplified version of this text. However much he may have simplified them, these precepts had a strong influence on Washington, who aimed to always live by them. The rules focus on self-respect and respect for others through details of etiquette. The rules offer pointers on such issues as how to dress, walk, eat in public, and address one's superiors.

Washington’s Masonic Correspondence As Found among the Washington Papers in the Library of Congress

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

George Washington’s Farewell Address

On September 17,1796, George Washington announced that he would leave the presidency. His famous farewell address encapsulates a view of the Union, the Constitution, and good citizenship that is an important part of American political thought today.