Tag Archives: History / General

The Journal of Major George Washington: An Account of His First Official Mission, Made as Emissary from the Governor of Virginia to the Commandant of the French Forces on the Ohio, Oct. 1753-Jan. 1754

Only eight original copies still exist of this stirring journal kept by young Major George Washington on his mission in 1753-1754 to warn the French against encroaching on British territory. Facsimile edition. 42 pp.; 1 black-and-white drawing; map; 5 x 7¾ ;

The Grand Idea: George Washington’s Potomac and the Race to the West

The Grand Idea follows George Washington in the critical period immediately after the War of Independence. The general had great hopes for his young nation, but also grave fears. He worried that the United States was so fragmented politically and culturally that it would fall apart, and that the "West," beyond the Appalachian mountains, would become a breakaway republic. So he came up with an ambitious scheme: He would transform the Potomac River into the nation's premier commercial artery, binding East and West, bolstering domestic trade, and staving off disunion. This was no armchair notion. Washington saddled up and rode west on a 680-mile trek to the raucous frontier of America.
Achenbach captures a Washington rarely seen: rugged frontiersman, real estate speculator, shrewd businessman. Even after his death, Washington's grand ambition inspired heroic engineering feats, including an audacious attempt to build a canal across the mountains to the Ohio River. But the country needed more than commercial arteries to hold together, and in the Civil War, the general's beloved river became a battlefield between North and South.
Like such classics as Undaunted Courage and Founding Brothers, Achenbach's riveting portrait of a great man and his grand plan captures the imagination of the new country, the passions of an ambitious people, and the seemingly endless beauty of the American landscape.

Thomas Jefferson, a Character Sketch (TREDITION CLASSICS)

This book is part of the TREDITION CLASSICS series. The creators of this series are united by passion for literature and driven by the intention of making all public domain books available in printed format again – worldwide. At tredition we believe that a great book never goes out of style. Several mostly non-profit literature projects provide content to tredition. To support their good work, tredition donates a portion of the proceeds from each sold copy. As a reader of a TREDITION CLASSICS book, you support our mission to save many of the amazing works of world literature from oblivion.

George Washington’s Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation (Little Books of Wisdom)

Copied out by hand as a young man aspiring to the status of Gentleman, George Washington's 110 rules were based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in 1595. The first English edition of these rules was available in Francis Hawkins' Youths Behavior, or Decency in Conversation Amongst Men, which appeared in 1640, and it is from work that Washington seems to have copied. The rules as Washington wrote them out are a simplified version of this text. However much he may have simplified them, these precepts had a strong influence on Washington, who aimed to always live by them. The rules focus on self-respect and respect for others through details of etiquette. The rules offer pointers on such issues as how to dress, walk, eat in public, and address one's superiors.

George Washington & Israel

Dr. Lillback's insightful work researches the question,'Is it inherently American to be pro-Israel?' While it is true Israel did not exist in Washington's day, in fact, the British Balfour Declaration of 1917 began the process of establishing Israel 130 years after the US Constitution was written. Yet, could the evidence from Washington's life and writings show that he knew far more about Israel than most thought possible? Within its pages, Dr. Lillback answers that question and reveals what other American presidents have to say on this very timely topic.

George Washington: The Crossing

From the author of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address comes a beautifully designed account of George Washington’s historic crossing of the Delaware River and the decisive Battle of Trenton—with a foreword by his son, #1 New York Times bestselling author Mark R. Levin.

Jack E. Levin, author of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, presents a beautifully designed and produced micro-history of George Washington’s daring forge of the Delaware River and the triumphant Battle of Trenton during the Revolutionary War. Accompanied by historic paintings, illustrations and maps from the era, George Washington: The Crossing is a dramatic and fascinating rendering of an honored American story.
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