Tag Archives: History / United States / General

The Grand Idea: George Washington’s Potomac and the Race to the West

The Grand Idea follows George Washington in the critical period immediately after the War of Independence. The general had great hopes for his young nation, but also grave fears. He worried that the United States was so fragmented politically and culturally that it would fall apart, and that the "West," beyond the Appalachian mountains, would become a breakaway republic. So he came up with an ambitious scheme: He would transform the Potomac River into the nation's premier commercial artery, binding East and West, bolstering domestic trade, and staving off disunion. This was no armchair notion. Washington saddled up and rode west on a 680-mile trek to the raucous frontier of America.
Achenbach captures a Washington rarely seen: rugged frontiersman, real estate speculator, shrewd businessman. Even after his death, Washington's grand ambition inspired heroic engineering feats, including an audacious attempt to build a canal across the mountains to the Ohio River. But the country needed more than commercial arteries to hold together, and in the Civil War, the general's beloved river became a battlefield between North and South.
Like such classics as Undaunted Courage and Founding Brothers, Achenbach's riveting portrait of a great man and his grand plan captures the imagination of the new country, the passions of an ambitious people, and the seemingly endless beauty of the American landscape.

George Washington Coloring Book (Dover History Coloring Book)

Memorable scenes from the life of the first American president, among them a battle with British forces against the French in 1754, appointment as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army (1775), and victory at Yorktown (1781). Entertaining, practical reference for young students of American history. Captions. 42 black-and-white illustrations.

Debunking David Barton’s Jefferson Lies: #2 – Jefferson Founded a Secular University

In his book The Jefferson Lies, Christian nationalist pseudo-historian David Barton professes to correct what he claims are seven lies about Thomas Jefferson, in chapters titled:
Lie #1: Thomas Jefferson Fathered Sally Hemings’ Children
Lie #2: Thomas Jefferson Founded a Secular University
Lie #3: Thomas Jefferson Wrote His Own Bible and Edited Out the Things He Didn’t Agree With
Lie #4: Thomas Jefferson Was a Racist Who Opposed Equality for Black Americans
Lie #5: Thomas Jefferson Advocated a Secular Public Square through the Separation of Church and State
Lie #6: Thomas Jefferson Detested the Clergy
Lie #7: Thomas Jefferson Was an Atheist and Not a Christian
It is David Barton, however, who is doing the lying, and not those whom he accuses of being the revisionists. Through a series of seven short books, one devoted to each of Barton’s seven Jefferson lies, the real liar will be revealed, and the real Thomas Jefferson will be preserved.
This volume debunks the many lies and misrepresentations used by Barton in the chapter of his book titled "Lie #2: Thomas Jefferson Founded a Secular University."

Hamilton’s Curse: How Jefferson’s Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution–and What It Means for Americans Today

Two of the most influential figures in American history. Two opposing political philosophies. Two radically different visions for America.

Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton were without question two of the most important Founding Fathers. They were also the fiercest of rivals. Of these two political titans, it is Jefferson—–the revered author of the Declaration of Independence and our third president—–who is better remembered today. But in fact it is Hamilton’s political legacy that has triumphed—–a legacy that has subverted the Constitution and transformed the federal government into the very leviathan state that our forefathers fought against in the American Revolution.
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George Washington and His Family Paper Dolls (Dover President Paper Dolls)

America's first president is spotlighted in this delightful and well-researched treasury of paper dolls. Meticulous representations of Martha, George, and four Custis grandchildren, plus 32 costumes: silk taffeta gown, embroidered waistcoats, knee breeches, black velvet suit, gold satin gown, much more. Accessories include bow-tied shoes, a parasol, and a gilded walking cane. Captions.

George Washington: The Founding Father (Eminent Lives)

By far the most important figure in the history of the United States, George Washington liberated the thirteen colonies from the superior forces of the British Empire against all military odds, and presided over the production and ratification of a constitution that (suitably amended) has lasted for more than two hundred years. Yet today Washington remains a distant figure to many Americans—a failing that acclaimed author Paul Johnson sets out to rectify with this brilliantly vivid, sharply etched portrait of the great hero as a young warrior, masterly commander in chief, patient lawmaker, and exceptionally wise president.

George Washington: The Crossing

From the author of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address comes a beautifully designed account of George Washington’s historic crossing of the Delaware River and the decisive Battle of Trenton—with a foreword by his son, #1 New York Times bestselling author Mark R. Levin.

Jack E. Levin, author of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, presents a beautifully designed and produced micro-history of George Washington’s daring forge of the Delaware River and the triumphant Battle of Trenton during the Revolutionary War. Accompanied by historic paintings, illustrations and maps from the era, George Washington: The Crossing is a dramatic and fascinating rendering of an honored American story.
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