Tag Archives: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Thomas Jefferson: America’s Paradoxical Patriot

This groundbreaking biography has been universally acclaimed as a landmark work on Thomas Jefferson's early and mature years. Mapp follows Jefferson from his birth in 1743 through the American Revolution and up until his inauguration as President of the United States in 1801. Along the way we rediscover Jefferson the student at William and Mary, the Virginia politician, and the foreign diplomat. In these pages, Mapp sheds new light on Jefferson's career and private life. The portrait is rich and full of a living complexity that defies the simple sketches often offered by those who would either canonize or demonize this reluctant founding father.

Thomas Jefferson and the Rhetoric of Virtue

Nearly 200 years after his death, Thomas Jefferson continues to fascinate and mystify scholars and the public alike. Recently, it seems that every aspect of his life and career, including a possible relationship with one of his slaves, has been put under the microscope. But Jefferson's interest in rhetoric, or discourse, has always been but a footnote before Jefferson and the Rhetoric of Virtue.
In this volume, James L. Golden and Alan L. Golden undertake the first careful study of Jefferson's rhetorical philosophy and practice. They find that not only did Jefferson take a great interest in classical and modern students of rhetoric, but that he developed his own program for its study. They also discover that Jefferson viewed the study of discourse as a vehicle for upholding virtue. Jefferson's commitment to virtue, the authors argue, helps to explain his interest in rhetoric, just as a study of his rhetorical philosophy leads to a deeper understanding of his commitment to virtue.
Golden and Golden discuss Jefferson's influences and education in rhetoric, how he came to be interested in the field, and the development of his philosophy on discourse. Supplemented by extensive primary source material, Thomas Jefferson and the Rhetoric of Virtue gives readers a first-hand account of Jefferson's understanding of virtue as viewed through his studies in rhetoric.

George Washington Remembers: Reflections on the French and Indian War

In 1786, George Washington wrote a rare autobiographical account of his service in the French and Indian War. In these eleven pages, Washington relates the compelling narrative of his experiences during the war, including a striking account of the friendly-fire incident at Fort Ligonier in 1758 that ". . . involved the life of GW in as much jeopardy as it had ever been before or since. . . . "

George Washington Remembers presents for the first time in print this extraordinary account that offers a very personal glimpse of a self-reflective leader seldom seen in Washington's other writings. The reproduction is accompanied by an annotated transcription of the piece and original essays that place the work in the context of the French and Indian War and Washington's life.
Continue reading