Tag Archives: The University of North Carolina Press

Thomas Jefferson: A Brief Biography

In this small jewel of a biography, readers will become acquainted with the mind and temperament of Thomas Jefferson as written by the greatest of Jefferson scholars. Dumas Malone, author of the unrivaled six-volume biography, Jefferson and His Time, brought fifty years of research and scholarship to the writing of this essay. It is a life story told with great respect and without hero worship.

Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times

As the oldest and favorite daughter of Thomas Jefferson, Martha "Patsy" Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836) was extremely well educated, traveled in the circles of presidents and aristocrats, and was known on two continents for her particular grace and sincerity. Yet, as mistress of a large household, she was not spared the tedium, frustration, and great sorrow that most women of her time faced. Though Patsy's name is familiar because of her famous father, Kierner is the first historian to place Patsy at the center of her own story, taking readers into the largely ignored private spaces of the founding era. Randolph's life story reveals the privileges and limits of celebrity and shows that women were able to venture beyond their domestic roles in surprising ways.
Following her mother's death, Patsy lived in Paris with her father and later served as hostess at the President's House and at Monticello. Her marriage to Thomas Mann Randolph, a member of Congress and governor of Virginia, was often troubled. She and her eleven children lived mostly at Monticello, greeting famous guests and debating issues ranging from a woman's place to slavery, religion, and democracy. And later, after her family's financial ruin, Patsy became a fixture in Washington society during Andrew Jackson's presidency. In this extraordinary biography, Kierner offers a unique look at American history from the perspective of this intelligent, tactfully assertive woman.

Jefferson and Religion (Monticello Monograph Series)

Thomas Jefferson's faith was of an eclectic sort; as he said, "I am of a sect by myself, as far as I know." He had a general interest in Christianity, seen through the lens of his Enlightenment philosophical views. He greatly admired the gospels and their central figure Jesus, but gave them a particularly Jeffersonian treatment in his own editing and reordering of them. This essay by Eugene R. Sheridan, is regarded by scholars as an authoritative treatment of a complex topic.
The essay in this book originally appeared as the introduction to Jefferson's Extracts from the Gospels, a volume in the second series of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, published by Princeton University Press in 1983.

Thomas Jefferson and Music, Revised Ed

For more than thirty years, Thomas Jefferson and Music has served as the definitive work on Jefferson’s musical knowledge and activities. Here, Helen Cripe discusses Jefferson's lifelong interest and involvement in music, his skill as a violinist, his knowledge of keyboard instruments and musical innovations, his musical library, the musical education of his daughters and granddaughters, and the instruments the family owned.

In this updated edition, Cripe provides more current information about the music and musical instruments of Jefferson's time, new details about musical activities in places Jefferson lived or traveled, and additional analysis of the importance of music to Jefferson and his family at Monticello. This edition also features many new illustrations, including selections of music from the Jefferson family music collection.

The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence Between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams

An intellectual dialogue of the highest plane achieved in America, the correspondence between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson spanned half a century and embraced government, philosophy, religion, quotidiana, and family griefs and joys. First meeting as delegates to the Continental Congress in 1775, they initiated correspondence in 1777, negotiated jointly as ministers in Europe in the 1780s, and served the early Republic—each, ultimately, in its highest office. At Jefferson's defeat of Adams for the presidency in 1800, they became estranged, and the correspondence lapses from 1801 to 1812, then is renewed until the death of both in 1826, fifty years to the day after the Declaration of Independence.

Lester J. Cappon's edition, first published in 1959 in two volumes, provides the complete correspondence between these two men and includes the correspondence between Abigail Adams and Jefferson. Many of these letters have been published in no other modern edition, nor does any other edition devote itself exclusively to the exchange between Jefferson and the Adamses. Introduction, headnotes, and footnotes inform the reader without interrupting the speakers. This reissue of The Adams-Jefferson Letters in a one-volume unabridged edition brings to a broader audience one of the monuments of American scholarship and, to quote C. Vann Woodward, 'a major treasure of national literature.'

Thomas Jefferson’s Garden Book

Thomas Jefferson's Garden Book is a compilation of Jefferson's own horticultural diary, along with many of his letters, drawings, and memoranda relating to his beloved gardens at Monticello and Poplar Forest. Compiled and annotated by the late Edwin Morris Betts, this classic volume captures the planning and planting, successes and failures of Jefferson's ambitious and experimental gardens.

Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's magnificent mountaintop home in Charlottesville, Virginia, has attracted public attention ever since Jefferson's day, when sightseers regularly visited the grounds in hopes of catching a glimpse of the former president. Today, each year more than half a million people from around the world visit Monticello, the only home in America on the United Nations' list of World Heritage Sites that must be protected at all costs.

Thomas Jefferson's Monticello is a superb collection of essays, adorned with beautiful color photography, that showcases this American treasure. Designed by Jefferson himself, Monticello is a model of elegance and symmetry. It is also home to Jefferson's world-class collection of art and porcelain from France, scientific instruments from England, the finest American furniture from Philadelphia and New York, and enduring furnishings made in Monticello's own joinery by enslaved craftsmen. The celebrated gardens and grounds form an experimental yet breathtakingly lovely landscape featuring flowers, fruits, and vegetables of the Old and New Worlds.
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